LEARNING HOW TO CATCH A FISH BY OBSERVING CONDITIONS

Catching any kind of game fish can be done by observing a few conditions. Observing these conditions can be the difference between merely getting your line wet and having a fun, successful day of catching several fish. How to catch a fish can be done by observing weather, water temperature, structure, and the shore line.

Weather conditions that affect us as humans, usually affect fishing conditions. When temperatures are on the rise, conditions improve. When temperatures are dropping, fishing can become more difficult. Watching the forecast can help you plan the times and days that you will want to fish.

LEARNING HOW TO CATCH A FISH BY OBSERVING CONDITIONS
LEARNING HOW TO CATCH A FISH BY OBSERVING CONDITIONS

For example, if the temperatures have been steadily hot, early morning and late evening fishing may be your best choice. If temperatures have been cold, many times mid-day and afternoon fishing are more ideal as the sun heats up the shallower water.

Water temperatures will have a direct effect in how to catch a fish. Shallow water tends to warm faster in the winter and early spring. This will attract bait fish, which in turn will attract game fish. Conversely, this same shallow water can get too hot in the summer time and drive fish deeper in the heat of the day.

Oxygen levels will decline in the shallow water during the summer which will cause game fish to stay in deeper water. Having plant life, such as lily pads and moss, can help shade the shallows and keep oxygen levels more stable. The best time to catch game fish in warmer weather is in the early morning or late evening before the shallows get too warm.

Learning how to catch a fish is also dependent upon structure. Structure is the items in the water, such as trees, stumps, rock, plants, and underwater ledges that fish use for protection and to help ambush bait fish. Some structure you can see above the water, while most of the structure is below the surface.

Learning how to catch a fish is also dependent upon structure. Structure is the items in the water, such as trees, stumps, rock, plants, and underwater ledges that fish use for protection and to help ambush bait fish. Some structure you can see above the water, while most of the structure is below the surface.

Finding structure is sometimes by accident as you snag your lure. Other times you can discover structure through lake maps and various technological devices designed to read the depths, structure, and life under the surface. Over time you will learn where most of the structure exists as you revisit the same fishing locations to make your time more productive.

Shorelines are a form of structure that will affect fish activity. A long smooth shore is typically not as productive as a shoreline with points and pockets. Many times the shoreline is a reflection of what the surface is like underwater. Points are sometimes one of the greatest locations to find fish. These points act as a transition from deeper water to shallow water that fish travel. Fishing a point that also has some type of structure can further increase the likelihood of finding a good fishing spot.

Learning how to catch a fish is not difficult if you learn to observe a few conditions around you. These conditions can be more important than the color and kind of lure you choose to use. While much of this is common sense, it can help you have a successful trip knowing when and where the fish are most likely to be.

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